Peer Reviewed Publications

Qigong exercise has shown promising results in clinical experience and in randomized, controlled pilot studies for affecting aspects of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) including blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, weight, BMI, and insulin resistance.

Putiri, A.L., Close, J.R., Lilly, H.R., Guillaume, N., & Sun, G.C. (2017). Qigong Exercises for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Medicines (Basel, Switzerland)4(3), 59. doi:10.3390/medicines4030059.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5622394/


Qigong exercise has shown promising results in clinical experience and in randomized, controlled pilot studies for affecting aspects of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) including positive associations between participation in Qigong and blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, weight, body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance. Lifestyle changes with appropriate diet and exercise are paramount in managing T2DM. Regular Qigong practice as part of one’s exercise routine can have a positive influence on one’s awareness of behaviors that either contribute to or improve one’s condition and can lead to helpful lifestyle changes, an overall sense of wellbeing and better health. Qigong exercises can play an important, synergistic role in integrative care with biomedical approaches and with acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine and nutrition for managing T2DM.

Sun, G.C., Osgood, C., and Lilly, H.R. (2017) Chinese Medical Therapies for Diabetes, Infertility, Silicosis and the Theoretical Basis. doi: 10.5772/67065.

https://www.intechopen.com/books/chinese-medical-therapies-for-diabetes-infertility-silicosis-and-the-theoretical-basis/qigong-for-the-management-of-type-2-diabetes-mellitus


The findings of the recent analysis of the Yi Ren Medical Qigong (YRMQ) intervention were associated with trends in weight loss (p=0.1), and Body Mass Index (BMI) reduction (p=0.04) and improvement of insulin resistance (IR) (p=0.075) in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The effect of YRMQ on IR may work different mechanisms from the active control group, progressive resistance training (PRT).

Sun, G.C., Ding, X., Zhou, X.H., Putiri, A., and Bradley, R. (2014). Effects of Yi Ren Medical Qigong on Body Weight in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study. Journal of Integrative Medicine & Therapy, 1(1): 5.

http://www.avensonline.org/wp-content/uploads/JIMT-2378-1343-01-0001.pdf


Yi Ren Medical Qigong (YRMQ) decreased perceived-stress scores by 29.3% (P < .05) and depression scores by 14.3% (not significant [NS]). The active control group, Progressive Resistance Training, also decreased stress scores by 18.6% (NS) and decreased depression scores by 50% (P < .03). Stress and depression measures remained unchanged in the standard care group, which followed usual care by their primary care physician only.

Putiri, A.L.1Lovejoy, J.C., Gillham, S., Sasagawa, M., Bradley, R., Sun, G.C. (2012).Psychological effects of Yi Ren Medical Qigong and progressive resistance training in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled pilot study. Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine. 18(1):30-4.

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/4192/7d50de63b4bf272afd43cb28b4fdcf87147e.pdf


Qigong therapy for twelve weeks resulted in significant reductions in fasting glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and demonstrated trends toward improvement in insulin resistance and A1c. These results suggest that Qigong may be an effective complementary therapy for individuals with type 2 diabetes.

Sun, G.C., Lovejoy, J.C., Gillham, S., Putiri, A., Sasagawa, M., and Bradley, R. (2010). Effects of Qigong on Glucose Control in Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care. 33(1): e8.

http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/33/1/e8